Four Futures: Life After Capitalism (Jacobin) (English Edition) Versión Kindle de Peter Frase


Four Futures: Life After Capitalism (Jacobin) (English Edition) Versión Kindle

de Peter Frase
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Book's Cover of Four Futures: Life After Capitalism (Jacobin) (English Edition) Versión Kindle

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�Frase injects a sorely needed dose of reality to the conversation, and the result is invigorating . . . I lost sleep over it.� ---Guardian --Este texto se refiere a la edición audioCD.. Peter Frase is an editor at Jacobin magazine where he's also a regular contributer and he posts shorter notes on his thoughts to his blog. He's also a lapsed academic sociologist. Bob Souer is a full-time professional storyteller and narrator. He has narrated numerous audiobooks, as well as broadcast and nonbroadcast projects for corporations and ministries across North America. You've heard Bob's voice on CBS, PBS, the History Channel, and many other networks. --Este texto se refiere a la edición audioCD.. An exploration of the utopias and dystopias that could develop from present societyPeter Frase argues that increasing automation and a growing scarcity of resources, thanks to climate change, will bring it all tumbling down. In Four Futures, Frase imagines how this post-capitalist world might look, deploying the tools of both social science and speculative fiction to explore what communism, rentism and extermininsm might actually entail.Could the current rise of the real-life robocops usher in a world that resembles Ender's Game? And sure, communism will bring an end to material scarcities and inequalities of wealth—but there's no guarantee that social hierarchies, governed by an economy of "likes," wouldn't rise to take their place. A whirlwind tour through science fiction, social theory and the new technologies are already shaping our lives, Four Futures is a balance sheet of the socialisms we may reach if a resurgent Left is successful, and the barbarisms we may be consigned to if those movements fail.

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The book show as the four futures after capitalism. Something I have never thougth about. Amazing topic to think about. The book show as the four futures after capitalism. Something I have never thougth about. Amazing topic to think about.
we can go to hell in a handbasket, or we can make better choices for the future of the planet, and the people that live on it! This is a thoughtful piece (set alongside Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism..) with extremely good background reference material pointers. The framing of the ideas as speculative (social science-) fiction is a neat one, though for someone who reads a LOT of SF, it misses some seminal futurism work (e.g. John Christopher wrote a lot of stories about semi-utopic possible futures much as pictured here, back in the 60s, plus Neal Stephenson's work often contains back stories of a similar nature (e.g. the Diamond Age, although most of the SF literature i've seen takes the dystopic alternates presented in this work - Ursula Le Guin's Dispossesed actually has 2 contrasting planets so she can contrast the dystopia with a near utopia which has scarce resource, which is an interesting departure from the scenarios here). That's just a minor whinge, though, as this is clearly written, and is something we all will have to confront in the next couple of decades, as the pace of environmental change picks up and the deployment of mass scale automation (e.g. self driving cars/trucks, smart homes, potentially free at the point of use green electricity, etc) accelerates. Current tired political dogmas of the left an the right are failing to address either of the key challenges discussed here in any meaningful way, so its great to have a clear, and relatively undogmatic dissection of the choices ahead.
Not for the conservative Four futures is a book of non-fiction essays and as the author is keen to point out is not a prediction of the future. It points to some interesting trends and takes them to their logical conclusion with the help of some sci-fi authors to illustrate the point. The first looks at the rise of robots taking over many jobs and the idea of the citizen’s income, which will free the masses from relying on paid employment. How this will affect individuals view of their worth and meaning and can we adapt to this sort of life is the question this raises? To sustain capitalism in a world full of robots, other things need to have a price. This is what the author calls rent of licences, which could be applied not only to land, but to the patents and copyright of ideas. The balance of power remains with the capitalist and this Marxist perspective is prominent throughout the book. The third scenario is about the environment and how we deal with climate change, yet still manage our desire for energy and natural resources. How we manage these scarce resources, who owns them and what we use them for? The most dark and bleak future is that of extermination. If the poor and low skilled jobs have been replaced by robots then they become superfluous. The rich capitalists seek to remove them with their gated communities and the logical step up from this is extermination. As the conclusion points out, no one future covers everything and the future is subject to change. In practice the different categories are likely to overlap. We have already seen the rise of robots, digitalisation and automation, along with ghetto’s and gated communities. The main criticism of this book is that it is short and does not cover the ideas in any depth and this is true, but the book is thought provoking and a good introduction to some of the ideas.